Computational Infrastructure
for Geodynamics (CIG)

Community-driven organization advancing Earth science by developing and disseminating software for geophysics and related fields.

Computational Infrastructure Gets a Redesign

We are very excited to share the new rebranding effort affecting all Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) materials including print, web, and social network presence.

Check out the press release

Get the Tools

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

ASPECT

NEW RELEASE 3.0.0

Finite element parallel code to simulate problems in thermal convection in both 2D and 3D models.
Current release: 2020-06-30
GNU GPL v2 or newer license

What Is happening?

Document

2020 CIG Annual Report

Applications are invited for Postdoctoral Researchers who are interested in contributing to the development and support…

Posted Aug 13

Document

2020 CIG Annual Report

December 1–17, 2020

Applications are invited for Postdoctoral Researchers who are interested in contributing to the development and support…

Posted Aug 13

Document

2020 CIG Annual Report

December 1–17, 2020

Applications are invited for Postdoctoral Researchers who are interested in contributing to the development and support…

Posted Aug 13

Document

2020 CIG Annual Report

December 1–17, 2020

Applications are invited for Postdoctoral Researchers who are interested in contributing to the development and support…

Posted Aug 13

Document

2020 CIG Annual Report

December 1–17, 2020

Applications are invited for Postdoctoral Researchers who are interested in contributing to the development and support…

Posted Aug 13

Document

2020 CIG Annual Report

December 1–17, 2020

Applications are invited for Postdoctoral Researchers who are interested in contributing to the development and support…

Posted Aug 13

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Research Highlight

Improving computational methods for imaging Earth’s interior

Contributed by Carl Tape, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Seismology offers the most powerful tool for characterizing the subsurface structure of Earth. Earthquakes occurring near the surface and as deep as 700 km emit elastic waves that are recorded by seismometers on Earth’s surface. The shapes and arrival times of the recorded waves can be compared with seismograms modeled in a relatively simple, starting description of Earth’s inner structure. By quantifying seismogram differences, seismologists can formally improve the description of Earth’s structure by performing an inverse problem known as tomography. Tomography, best known in the medical fields, is about characterizing variations in a 3D medium (human body, oil reservoir, Earth’s mantle) without directly measuring the properties.

Over the past 20 years, advances in computational methods and high-performance computing have enabled a new, more accurate form of seismic tomography. Previously the tomographic problem began with a simple description of Earth, whereby analytical methods could be used to represent wave propagation and measurement sensitivities. Now, it is possible to begin with a more accurate and complex 3D description of Earth, while also using 3D numerical simulations to account for realistic complexities of wave propagation.